Tom Ashe on Proper Lighting for Evaluating Photographic Prints - Trust Me Shops
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Tom Ashe on Proper Lighting for Evaluating Photographic Prints

Tom Ashe on Proper Lighting for Evaluating Photographic Prints

Short Description:
While much has been written about the significance of color management to optimal print output, the topic of adequate lighting conditions for the viewing and evaluation of photographic prints is an important detail that's usually given short shrift.

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While much has been written about the significance of color management to optimal print output, the topic of adequate lighting conditions for the viewing and evaluation of photographic prints is an important detail that's usually given short shrift.
Tom P. Ashe is an undisputed expert in translating transitory images viewed on a screen to a stunning presence in print. In addition to literally writing the book on this subject with his 2014 title Color Management and Quality Output: Working with Color from Camera to Display to Print, Ashe is an internationally recognized educator who serves today as chair of the MPS Digital Photography program at New York's School of Visual Arts (SVA).
Photographs © Tom P. Ashe
We recently queried Ashe about best practices for establishing adequate lighting conditions in which to evaluate prints, to shed light on (pun intended) both the environmental factors involved and the range of products available to help you achieve best results.
Jill Waterman: How did you first get interested in printing and color management?
Tom Ashe: My interest started at RIT. I was in the Imaging and Photographic Technology program, which was the geekier side of photography, but still hanging out with photographers rather than the full-on imaging science folks. Early on, I was drawn to things around color and how color worked in relation to printing presses, prepress, and such. This was in the early 1990s, just as digital was starting, so I was really tied in with all the new technologies around printing, photography, and digital that were happening at that time. I had pictured what I'd do out of school would be to work at a magazine, like Time, and optimize color reproduction between the photographers and the printing press.
I never did that exactly; I ended up working for Kodak for eight years. In my last 3 ½ years I worked for Kodak Professional, doing everything that was digital at the time. I was working with all their digital cameras and scanners, as well as their printers—from true photographic printers to inkjet and dye sublimation—everything they had. I'd describe it as having a lot of great toys to play with.

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