Podcasting While Social Distancing - Trust Me Shops
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Podcasting While Social Distancing

Podcasting While Social Distancing

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It has been said through the ages that necessity is the mother of invention and, based upon the surge in interest we’re seeing in remote podcasting during these strange and uncertain times, I’m realizing that it truly is

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It has been said through the ages that necessity is the mother of invention and, based upon the surge in interest we’re seeing in remote podcasting during these strange and uncertain times, I’m realizing that it truly is. COVID-19 has upended life as we know it for much of the US. People are cooped up in their homes, and everyone is wondering if this is the new normal. Many jobs have been lost, and if you’re lucky enough to have one, you’re working from home, doing everything you can to keep it. As many podcasters did, we scrambled to take the B&H Photography Podcast fully remote. While it wasn’t without hiccups, we did manage to pull it off, and we learned some things along the way that we’d like to share.
When we record the B&H Photography Podcast under usual circumstances, we’ll often have three or four people in the studio, and sometimes a call-in guest or two via Skype. Everything that we record from Skype, whether there’s one, two, or more call-ins, gets recorded onto one track. While that’s certainly not ideal for work in post, it’s pretty rare that we have multiple remote guests for one show, and when we have had them, they usually aren’t interviewed at the same time. In other words, there wasn’t much chance of people talking over each other. Now, we find ourselves in a situation where we all become remote guests, and if you’ve ever listened to our show, then you already know that our guests and hosts talk over each other incessantly, so getting each speaker on their own discrete track is crucial for mixing and editing.
That really only left two options. One would be to have each guest record themselves separately, presumably using their personal computer or phone. There are some well-known podcasts that record remote interviews in this way, but those generally comprise just one interviewer and one interviewee. Our show has a host (Allan Weitz) and a co-host (John Harris) to begin with, and if you add one, two, or three guests into that equation, all responsible for recording their own audio, there’s a huge margin for error.

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